<table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="background-color:#f5f5f5; text-align:center; overflow:hidden"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><div><link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css2?family=Merriweather:wght@900&amp;display=swap" rel="stylesheet"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; background-color:#fff;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5%; text-align:left; font-weight:700; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 20px;"><span style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 17px; color: #c80000;">CHINA</span><span style="font-family: 'Merriweather', serif; font-size: 15.5px; color: #001544;">Debate</span></td><td style="padding:3.5%; text-align:right; font-weight:normal; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal;color: #001544; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5%; text-align:center;"><a style="border-bottom: none;text-decoration: none;color: #001544;" href="https://www.chinadebate.com/china-macro-reporter/archive" target="_blank"><img style="width:70px; border-radius:3%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19);" src="https://assets-global.website-files.com/5a3e922cf6b9a40001bc2d6b/5e3dbbf161e6c357b022bea5_China%20Macro%20Reporter%20.png" alt="China_Macro_Reporter"></a></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align:center; font-size: 27px; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#001544; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: -0.5px; line-height: 1;">China Macro Reporter</td></tr><tr><td style="text-align:center; line-height:1.5; padding-bottom:35px; padding-top:10px; font-size: 13px; color:#001544; font-family:'gordita', sans-serif;">By Malcolm Riddell<span style="margin:0 6px">·</span>August 12, 2020</td></tr><tr><td style="text-align:center; line-height:1.5; display:block; max-width:480px; margin:0 auto; padding:7px 0; font-size: 1.175em; font-family: Georgia, serif; color:#c80000; font-weight:normal; letter-spacing: -0.5px; border-bottom:2px solid #c80000;">Opening Statement</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5S0OUC?track_p_id=1X8TzJyI_VTE5%40yOssGOp1l" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/4x73lYAycA6tlG4fEtV_j0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5S0OUC?track_p_id=dZYEEvYkoVsshw8TzJyI_gk" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">TikTok/WeChat | Jimmy Lai's Arrest | Sec Azar's Taiwan Visit</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5S0OUC?track_p_id=5vRDgS8TzJyI_jqQ3oNNfat" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/yFphxEfwPePmOC_d_T40YEi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5S0OUC?track_p_id=6i2SC%40V8TzJyI_PVu%40FbXsO" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">TikTok/WeChat | Jimmy Lai's Arrest | Sec Azar's Taiwan Visit</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h1 style="display: inline-block;font-size: 1.35em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;line-height: 1.35em;font-weight: normal;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;color: #001544;letter-spacing: -0.1px;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Greetings!</strong></h1><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><span style="color: #d0021b"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">It’s August,</strong></em></span><span style="color: #d0021b"><em style="font-style: italic"> and from now until Labor Day, the China Macro Reporter will publish less often and have fewer posts.</em></span></p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><span style="color: #d0021b"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">But if some big things happen,</strong></em></span><span style="color: #d0021b"><em style="font-style: italic"> we’ll bring you the analyses you need to understand those events.</em></span></li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Three big things</strong> to follow:</p><ol style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0px;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">President’s moves</strong> to ban TikTok and WeChat</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">The arrest of Jimmy Lai</strong> in Hong Kong</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Secretary Azar’s</strong> visit to Taiwan.</li></ol><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">President Trump’s moves</strong> to ban TikTok and WeChat in the U.S. – big deals in themselves&nbsp; - appear to be part of a broader strategy, or strategies. The FT quotes Bonnie Glaser:</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">“While Trump and his campaign team</strong> are using China to boost his re-election chances, senior administration officials have other goals,” said Bonnie Glaser, a China expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘ “They appear to want to lock in</strong> strategic, system rivalry with China so that if Biden is elected it can’t be reversed.” ’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Which raises</strong> the questions:</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">To win, will Mr. Trump,</strong> egged on by the China Hawks who have their own agenda, escalate his punitive actions against China before the election?</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">If he is re-elected</strong> will he ease off the throttle or just keep going? And if he just keeps going, how will that impact Asian regional security, international finance, and global markets?</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Finally,</strong> can this flurry of moves really bind a Biden administration? In the current bipartisan China-bashing mood a President Biden could have a tough time going against the status quo left by the Trump administration.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">The arrest of Jimmy Lai,</strong> the highest-profile so far, leaves no doubt about how China intends to implement the National Security Law in Hong Kong.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">As some have noted,</strong> Xi Jinping didn’t need tanks to cow Hong Kong’s citizens; he just needed a platform for ‘white terror,’ and he has that now.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Among the many reasons</strong> the arrest of Jimmy Lai is different from the rest of the increasingly intense crackdown is that he not only known as a fearless pro-democracy advocate in Hong Kong, but he has also met with officials in Washington, including Mike Pence and Nancy Pelosi, to discuss Hong Kong’s plight.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">In the same way</strong> that George Floyd became the symbol of Black Lives Matter, Mr. Lai – especially if he is tried in China, not Hong Kong, and is, as expected, given a harsh sentence up to life imprisonment – Mr. Lai could become a symbol and rallying point in Hong Kong and in the world against China’s repressive regime.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Ultimately,</strong> the meaning of Jimmy Lai’s arrest is that, as the FT Editorial Board puts it:</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Freedom of the press</strong> appears to have ended in Hong Kong.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The instinct of many multinational businesses</strong> based in Hong Kong will be to keep their heads down and hope that they can continue to prosper — if they steer clear of politics.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘That strategy</strong> may work in the short term. But it will still be fraught with risk.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Will analysts at a Hong Kong financial institution</strong> dare a critical assessment of key topics — such as the sustainability of the peg between the Hong Kong dollar and US dollar; or question the business interests of key members of the Chinese governing elite?’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The Hong Kong brand</strong> has always been bound up with the rule of law and freedom of expression.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Without those freedoms,</strong> Hong Kong will be a sadly diminished place.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Finally,</strong> Secretary Azar’s official visit to Taiwan, the highest-level U.S. official to visit in decades, and his strong message of support from President Trump could signal a new – and much needed – rethinking of U.S. commitment to Taiwan and its defense.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Or it could</strong> just be a campaign move.</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Either way</strong> China is not happy.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">But not as unhappy</strong> as it would have been if a senior national security official had made the visit.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Baby steps.</strong> Baby steps.</li></ul><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Go deeper into these issues - Browse the posts below.</strong></h2><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">To read the original article, click the title.</strong></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Let me know what you think. </strong>And please forward the <strong style="font-weight: bold">China Macro Reporter</strong> to your friends and colleagues.</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">All the best,</strong></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Malcolm</strong></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:40px auto 0 auto;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align:center; display:block; padding:10px; background-color:#c80000; font-size: 1.375em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#ffffff; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: 0px; line-height:1.35em; border-bottom:0px solid #f5f5f5;">1. From China Rhetoric to Action</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6PHZGS?track_p_id=74moYP3W5At1EU_LD%40c5Ga1" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/9LSioKgMjYvc5O-fygiKS0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6PHZGS?track_p_id=cUPPz5tb3S5eZ5At1EU_sWl" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">'Trump's swift, sweeping China offensive'</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div></td></tr><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><div></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6PHZGS?track_p_id=1o5At1EU_y1Vw424jQRdQeQ" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/tLa94SAZCog0pXbPJZVrxUi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6PHZGS?track_p_id=3lWE5At1EU_P4IGGHaagDFu" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Trump's swift, sweeping China offensive</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Axios</strong></h3><h3 style="display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">David Lawler </strong>| Axios</h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The bottom line:&nbsp;It feels as though we’ve seen a decades’-worth of hawkish policies proposed or executed just in the past few weeks.’</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘President Trump's rhetoric on China</strong> has tended to run hotter than his actions —&nbsp;until now.’</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Why it matters:&nbsp;</strong>Even at the height of Trump's trade war, his administration never hit China as hard, as fast, and on as many fronts as it is right now.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Thursday night</strong>, Trump&nbsp;<a href="https://www.axios.com/trump-china-tiktok-wechat-c6902d5d-649d-476d-8dec-a84e29ee06b6.html" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">escalated his campaign</a>&nbsp;to claw apart the Chinese and American tech worlds with executive orders that threaten to ban both TikTok and massive global messaging app WeChat.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘On Friday</strong>, the Treasury Department&nbsp;<a href="https://www.axios.com/us-sanctions-carrie-lam-hong-kong-china-0884330d-5755-4d91-bc17-358e5b1470c9.html" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">sanctioned Carrie Lam</a>, Hong Kong's Beijing-backed leader for "implementing Beijing's policies of suppression of freedom and democratic processes." ’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘That move follows</strong>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.axios.com/us-sanctions-china-paramilitary-xinjiang-xpcc-41e29c92-9649-4e47-9e91-a7f78330d4d8.html?utm_source=newsletter&amp;utm_medium=email&amp;utm_campaign=sendto_newslettertest&amp;stream=top" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">sanctions</strong></a>&nbsp;on the Xinjiang Production and Construction Corps, a powerful paramilitary organization, for its role in the mass detention of ethnic minorities.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The U.S. has</strong>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.axios.com/us-china-consulate-closures-espionage-spying-ad9c5e77-eb1d-4ccf-8315-6906cf981ebc.html" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">closed China’s consulate</strong></a>&nbsp;in Houston, stepped up its efforts to keep Chinese telecom giant Huawei out of allies' 5G networks, and even&nbsp;<a href="https://www.axios.com/bill-barr-us-companies-china-8532218d-b20b-4dd3-86e1-c481c1744178.html" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">warned blue chip American companies</a>&nbsp;that they could face legal penalties for doing Beijing's bidding.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Health Secretary Alex Azar</strong>&nbsp;<strong style="font-weight: bold">will</strong>&nbsp;<strong style="font-weight: bold">soon</strong>&nbsp;become the highest-ranking U.S. official to visit Taiwan in four decades, in a pointed signal of support for the self-governing island that&nbsp;<a href="https://www.axios.com/azar-taiwan-visit-us-high-level-trip-first-7d285127-2dda-40d2-a025-8cc4e4b28e34.html" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">has infuriated Beijing</a>.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Between the lines:&nbsp;</strong>In some cases, Trump has been responding to China's actions — most notably, the draconian security law for Hong Kong. But there may be more to the sudden offensive.’</p><ol style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0px;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Politics:</strong>Trump is betting a tough-on-China push will resonate with voters in an election year, and his advisers — including trade adviser Peter Navarro,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.axios.com/peter-navarro-tiktok-19ba01a8-8368-4c25-bb2f-13fc09e71d13.html" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">on our Pro Rata podcast</a>&nbsp;— often&nbsp;<a href="https://www.axios.com/china-coronavirus-poll-cbbc0dc4-7c3a-4cc7-8b83-cb1c7dcacc89.html" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">cite polling</a>&nbsp;suggesting he’s right to do so.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Trade:</strong>Trump&nbsp;<a href="https://www.axios.com/trump-uighur-muslims-sanctions-d4dc86fc-17f4-42bd-bdbd-c30f4d2ffa21.html" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">has admitted</a>&nbsp;his desire to secure a trade deal with China caused him to pull punches in the past, including over the mass detentions in Xinjiang. Trade talks&nbsp;<a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-trade-china-trump/trump-says-he-is-not-interested-in-trade-talks-with-china-idUSKCN24F2Q4" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">are now on ice</a>, perhaps permanently.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Markets</strong>: Thanks to the $2 trillion CARES Act and the Federal Reserve's promise to do "whatever it takes" to support markets, investors have largely ignored trade war headlines and continued to bid stock prices higher.’</li></ol><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The bottom line:</strong>&nbsp;It feels as though we’ve seen a decades’-worth of hawkish policies proposed or executed just in the past few weeks, notes Axios China reporter Bethany Allen-Ebrahmian.’&nbsp;</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:40px auto 0 auto;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align:center; display:block; padding:10px; background-color:#c80000; font-size: 1.375em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#ffffff; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: 0px; line-height:1.35em; border-bottom:0px solid #f5f5f5;">2. Banning TikTok &amp; WeChat</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/8WZ2vI?track_p_id=8tJP6uw4G5OjEsA_lWjRZts" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/fT8DySfKfRttY-U-TpJFkEi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/8WZ2vI?track_p_id=1W5OjEsA_VAJoXpsEJdGVPa" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Why is the Trump administration banning TikTok and WeChat?</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/8WZ2vI?track_p_id=aMukdIwcd5A5OjEsA_gan3s" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/LSLWKBI6HgWWsgSz40ANz0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/8WZ2vI?track_p_id=1w5OjEsA_G3sjYlaMu1ZXII" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Why is the Trump administration banning TikTok and WeChat?</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Brookings</strong></h3><h3 style="display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Jeffrey Gertz |</strong> Brookings</h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘We appear to be headed toward a world where the internet applications available to citizens differ based on where they live—and the geopolitical commitments of their home country governments.’</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Late Wednesday night,</strong> President Trump issued&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/executive-order-addressing-threat-posed-tiktok/" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">executive</a>&nbsp;<a href="https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/executive-order-addressing-threat-posed-wechat/" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">orders</a>&nbsp;that will effectively ban two major Chinese apps from the U.S. market.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The orders state</strong> that, 45 days from now, Americans will be prohibited from carrying out any transactions with the parent companies of TikTok and WeChat—meaning U.S. companies and individuals couldn’t advertise with the platforms, offer them for download via app stores, or enter into licensing agreements with them.’&nbsp;</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">TikTok. ‘For TikTok,</strong> the most immediate question is how this will influence a possible acquisition by Microsoft.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Microsoft </strong>had previously publicly announced its interest in acquiring TikTok and was in advanced talks with both the U.S. government and ByteDance to work out the details of such a transaction subject to any CFIUS concerns.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘But in the last few days,</strong> President Trump has&nbsp;<a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/business-53633315" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">declared that he expected any such deal to also include a substantial payment to the U.S. Treasury</a>—a request without any clear founding in CFIUS statutes, and which may have raised some red flags for Microsoft.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The new IEEPA ruling </strong>now means any sale of TikTok would need to be complete within 45 days, and also seemingly would prevent any ongoing commercial relationships between TikTok U.S. assets owned by Microsoft and TikTok operations still owned by ByteDance operating in other countries.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘This would appear</strong> to make it impossible for certain star TikTok performers to have licensing deals integrated across TikTok platforms, for instance, or for any joint branding.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Wednesday’s declaration </strong>thus likely lowers the value of TikTok U.S. to Microsoft (or any other potential acquirer).’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘If this ultimately quashes </strong>a deal and leads TikTok to entirely pull out of the U.S. market, the Trump administration may face political ramifications from 100 million disappointed users of the app in the U.S.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">WeChat. ‘With respect to WeChat,</strong> meanwhile, the biggest immediate question is how well the app will be able to continue functioning after the ban goes into effect.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The ban</strong> would seemingly block new downloads or updates of WeChat from any app stores within the U.S., but would not cut off access overnight.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Continued functionality of WeChat</strong> is an important concern for the Chinese diaspora in the U.S.; in part because access to many American social network apps is blocked in China,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/07/business/trump-china-wechat-tiktok.html" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">WeChat is a primary communication tool for students and immigrants to keep in touch with friends and family in China</a>.’</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Impact. ‘The executive orders </strong>also underline what’s at stake in the potential “decoupling” of the U.S. and Chinese economies, and raise the prospect of a splintered global internet.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘We appear to be headed toward</strong> a world where the internet applications available to citizens differ based on where they live—and the geopolitical commitments of their home country governments.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Of course,</strong> this has long been the case in China, where the Chinese Communist Party’s ”<a href="https://www.scmp.com/abacus/who-what/what/article/3089836/story-chinas-great-firewall-worlds-most-sophisticated" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">Great Firewall</a>” has significantly limited how the internet is experienced in China in line with its own political objectives.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘But</strong> if this move signals the U.S. government is going to follow a similar path, then a broader rupturing of the global internet may be at hand.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:40px auto 0 auto;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align:center; display:block; padding:10px; background-color:#c80000; font-size: 1.375em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#ffffff; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: 0px; line-height:1.35em; border-bottom:0px solid #f5f5f5;">3. The Vise Tightens in Hong Kong</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6atyCm?track_p_id=5WNVq66sbF0Q_gaphr3C5VR" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/5UuPvEoCc6pbXv9dMT1crki__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6atyCm?track_p_id=2XU6sbF0Q_UqqHArWaT4%40Ns" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Hong Kong media entrepreneur and activist Jimmy Lai arrested' [from the German]</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; padding-bottom:20px;"><tbody><tr><td><img width="100%" src="https://img.scoop.it/e73wRLDj6t5OydijPZo9wDl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBXdhNIf0Yl8YfRAVzhohB7e"></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6atyCm?track_p_id=7oRX4DQA6sbF0Q_3zOUkqQg" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/qbRpfEh5B3MX_AVTZBNvK0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6atyCm?track_p_id=amrh631ZB2u6sbF0Q_HgjSu" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Hong Kong media entrepreneur and activist Jimmy Lai arrested [Hongkong: Medienunternehmer und Aktivist Jimmy Lai festgenommen]&nbsp;</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Der Spiegel</strong></h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Jimmy Lai is self-confident, loud - and has been a figure of hatred for Beijing's propaganda for years.&nbsp;The police have now arrested the publisher who is critical of China.&nbsp;He faces imprisonment, possibly for life.’</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;">&nbsp;<strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The Chinese censors</strong> no longer bothered to suppress the first international comments.’&nbsp;</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘While the screen</strong> almost always goes black when Western news channels report from&nbsp;<a href="https://www.spiegel.de/thema/hongkong/" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">Hong Kong</a>, this message initially went uncensored on Monday morning in China:'&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">'</strong><a href="https://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/hongkonger-medienunternehmer-und-aktivist-jimmy-lai-festgenommen-a-0fe869d7-3511-41f0-aba6-d10f42f944b0" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Jimmy Lai arrested</strong></a>- Hong Kong's pro-democratic media tycoon, a "bitter government critic," as the BBC aptly called him.’&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘ "Icy"</strong> is the atmosphere that is now&nbsp;spreading in the city&nbsp;five weeks after&nbsp;<a href="https://www.spiegel.de/politik/ausland/hongkong-neue-details-zu-chinas-sicherheitsgesetz-a-3ec238b0-aa97-4399-bec3-e7abee8f9aca" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">the new State Security Act was</a> imposed.'</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘It is the most massive attack</strong> by the authorities on Hong Kong's media to date - and Jimmy Lai the most prominent representative of the democratic camp, who was arrested for violating the new so-called security law.’&nbsp;</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘He is suspected</strong> of "colluding with foreign powers".’&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Should he be convicted,</strong> he faces three to ten years, if his case is classified as "serious", even life imprisonment.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Jimmy Lai</strong> has been arrested several times for minor offenses such as participating in unauthorized demonstrations.’&nbsp;</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘So far he has always</strong> been released on bail.’&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘That is not to be expected</strong> under the new State Security Act.'&nbsp;</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘It is even possible</strong> that he will be tried not in Hong Kong but in mainland China.’&nbsp;</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘ "Lai will most likely face</strong> a heavy sentence," announced the Beijing Global Times.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘In addition to violating the new security law,</strong> the authorities are apparently preparing a fraud charge against Lai.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Beijing</strong> seems to want to make sure that Hong Kong's judiciary does not release him on bail again.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘ "Hong Kong's police</strong> couldn't do much against you," commented a user on the Chinese short message service Weibo.’&nbsp;</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">"The security law can."</strong></li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="height:40px; font-size:0; background-color:#f6f6f6;">&nbsp;                </td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/90mAsq?track_p_id=ccNTE4xt5nhzV8wgjS2_HBv" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/K9fKxwrt-0GqvuYSovNp30i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/90mAsq?track_p_id=2EO8wgjS2_3sAuOwxSh%40F3l" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Who Is Jimmy Lai and Why Was the Apple Daily Publisher Arrested in Hong Kong?</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/90mAsq?track_p_id=4U5nA8wgjS2_MxGTURC1a2l" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/47C-7DT_qXLeochltz93d0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/90mAsq?track_p_id=8CimNR%40Gu8wgjS2_ACyQDbs" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Who Is Jimmy Lai and Why Was the Apple Daily Publisher Arrested in Hong Kong?</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">The Wall Street Journal</strong></h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘But his arrest was no surprise. When China introduced the National Security Law on June 30, many commentators and pro-Beijing groups said Mr. Lai would be a top target.’</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><span style="color: #d0021b"><strong style="font-weight: bold">'Q: Who is Jimmy Lai?'</strong></span></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Hong Kong media mogul Jimmy Lai,</strong> founder of the popular Apple Daily newspaper, was arrested Monday morning at his residence on allegations of foreign collusion under China’s national-security law.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘His two sons and four employees</strong> from his media company were also arrested, and about 200 police officers raided the newspaper’s newsroom.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Here’s what we know</strong> about the media magnate and his newspaper.’</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The media mogul</strong> is the founder of&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wsj.com/market-data/quotes/HK/XHKG/282" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">Next Digital</a>,&nbsp;which publishes Apple Daily as its flagship newspaper and regularly criticizes China’s leaders as well as supporting last year’s protest movement.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘He has been a longtime critic </strong>of China’s ruling Communist Party and in recent weeks has taken to doing a weekly Q&amp;A with viewers on his&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wsj.com/market-data/quotes/TWTR" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">Twitter</a> He financially supported the city’s pro-democracy politicians.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><span style="color: #d0021b"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Q: Why was he arrested?'</strong></span></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Police have said</strong> only that Mr. Lai was arrested with other Next employees on suspicion of colluding with foreign forces to interfere with China’s national security in Hong Kong, without providing specifics.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘But his arrest</strong> was no surprise.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘When China introduced the National Security Law</strong> on June 30, many commentators and pro-Beijing groups said Mr. Lai would be a top target.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘State media have accused Mr. Lai</strong> of colluding with foreign forces to promote the partly autonomous city’s secession from Beijing.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Mr. Lai met U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo</strong> in the White House in July last year to discuss Hong Kong’s political situation as residents of the city staged mass protests against a since-withdrawn bill that would have enabled criminal suspects to be sent from the city to mainland China for trial.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Mr. Lai also met Vice President Mike Pence</strong> on the trip, which drew condemnation from top Chinese officials.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘However,</strong> China’s national-security law, enacted on June 30, isn’t retroactive.’</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><span style="color: #d0021b"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Q: What is Apple Daily known for?’</strong></span></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Apple Daily</strong> has become one of Hong Kong’s most-read newspapers, increasingly known as a pro-democracy activist publication.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘It has printed protest posters</strong> both in the paper and separately for use at big demonstrations, such as the July 1 handover anniversary.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Pro-democracy supporters in Hong Kong</strong> see buying a subscription and buying the company’s stock as ways to contribute to the protest movement.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="height:40px; font-size:0; background-color:#f6f6f6;">&nbsp;                </td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6uCR4C?track_p_id=cyveQt3Y%40aNOl8KgxSg_14X" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/Fo7ntZ9ZrZNKfYOiaIEwBEi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6uCR4C?track_p_id=1H8KgxSg_5A2W1j%40CZwFBpU" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Watch the Jimmy Lai Case</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; padding-bottom:20px;"><tbody><tr><td><img width="100%" src="https://img.scoop.it/dcRB_kWH5UQ6-pveSdL1nDl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBXdhNIf0Yl8YfRAVzhohB7e"></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6uCR4C?track_p_id=2dq8KgxSg_NCzeEkrCqOerK" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/K3QnfSaJPzkG44VHcoZ_r0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6uCR4C?track_p_id=2md8KgxSg_pmI%40YAde4gxdJ" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Watch the Jimmy Lai Case</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Jerry’s Blog</strong></h3><h3 style="display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Jerome A. Cohen</strong></h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Over the next few months, it will be very important to try to observe the procedures in these new types of Hong Kong criminal cases.’</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The recent&nbsp;</strong><a href="https://jeromecohen.us11.list-manage.com/track/click?u=75ccbf179b52f85e76067015c&amp;id=af8b6e7ad1&amp;e=387aa8fa4b" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">arrest of Jimmy Lai</strong></a>&nbsp;for “alleged foreign collusion” ’ raises questions.</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Over the next few months,</strong> it will be very important to try to observe the procedures in these new types of Hong Kong criminal cases.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘To what extent</strong> will court procedures be open for public observation?’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Will prosecutors</strong> be obligated to reveal in open court the bases for the&nbsp; arrests?’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Will defense counsel</strong> be allowed to inform the public about the details of the proceedings?’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Many questions </strong>have already arisen.’&nbsp;</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘For example,</strong> regarding the six overseas activists abroad recently placed on the Wanted for Arrest list (one is a US citizen), has the PRC implemented the Interpol notification process?’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘If so,</strong> with what responses from various countries thus far?’&nbsp;</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘For Lai’s case,</strong> will there now be a move to transfer him and his co-defendants to the Mainland for investigation and trial?’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘By what procedures?</strong> Secret or public? With any possible resort to HK courts?’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘In a case</strong> that arose a few days earlier, are the four arrested suspects who are 21 and younger to be charged for their Internet messages alone or for other conduct?’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘How will their cases</strong> be processed?’&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘If HK’s Director of Public Prosecutions</strong> has just resigned because of the refusal of his bosses in the Department of Justice and higher in the HK Government to allow him to know about NSL prosecutions, how much will the HK Bar, the media and the public be allowed to know about such matters?’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘I hope the courageous Jimmy Lai’s</strong> confidence in his prison future is not misplaced.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘In an interview with AFP,</strong> he said that “he is prepared for prison. If it comes, I will have the opportunity to read books I haven’t read.” ’&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘He has said</strong> he will not leave Hong Kong.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘But can he</strong> be sure?’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘If transferred for detention</strong>, interrogation and trial on the Mainland under the NSL, he will leave HK against his will.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Moreover,</strong> is he correct in assuming that, if imprisoned, he will catch up on his reading?’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Mainland jails and prisons</strong> are not as lenient as some Hong Kong counterparts.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Ask the two&nbsp;Canadian Michaels</strong> what books they have been reading, even though the lights may still be kept on in their cells 24/7!’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Ask human rights lawyer Wang Quanzhang</strong> what he read during his five years of torture.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Ask artist Ai Weiwei</strong> what he read during his months of “residential surveillance” at a designated location, even though he had to be released before prosecution because of political pressures.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘If Lai’s paper, Apple Daily,</strong> manages to continue to publish, I hope it can report on what has been too largely ignored to date— the underlying reasons why the HK Director of Public Prosecutions (HKDPP) resigned.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘What does this foretell for Jimmy Lai </strong>and many others that the HKDPP is not only not allowed to decide who gets prosecuted under the NSL, but he is not even allowed to know what is going on in the decision-making process!'&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Good luck, Jimmy!!’</strong></li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:40px auto 0 auto;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align:center; display:block; padding:10px; background-color:#c80000; font-size: 1.375em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#ffffff; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: 0px; line-height:1.35em; border-bottom:0px solid #f5f5f5;">4. Ramping Up U.S.-Taiwan Relations</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6iVZ56?track_p_id=8SaYPnK3d8xOSEA_madXgKs" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/3QKIJ28TXRxlm_PNLipujEi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6iVZ56?track_p_id=1H8xOSEA_HPAZKwfcPkP%40OH" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">'As U.S.-China Ties Deteriorate, Taiwan’s Importance Grows&nbsp;'</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; padding-bottom:20px;"><tbody><tr><td><img width="100%" src="https://img.scoop.it/AN3CPrjvY4PzKyMOg-YqnDl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBXdhNIf0Yl8YfRAVzhohB7e"></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6iVZ56?track_p_id=aoaZd3ZB%40bb8xOSEA_NkO%40F" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/uU7qmWyQOJg8fmmGA7lp70i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6iVZ56?track_p_id=cPIqgVepSyAwo8xOSEA_5o2" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">As U.S.-China Ties Deteriorate, Taiwan’s Importance Grows&nbsp;</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">The New York Times</strong></h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Mr. Azar’s trip, the highest-level visit to Taiwan by an American official since Washington severed official ties with the island in 1979, pointed to the increasingly important role Taiwan will play in a brewing ideological battle between the two superpowers.’</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The United States’ top health official</strong> lauded Taiwan’s democracy and its response to the coronavirus. Taiwan’s president&nbsp;<a href="https://english.president.gov.tw/News/6026" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">hailed the island’s growing economic and public health ties</a>&nbsp;with the United States.’</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Yet just offstage</strong> from this show of bonhomie on Monday between Alex M. Azar II, the secretary of health and human services, and President Tsai Ing-wen of Taiwan was the looming force of China.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Beijing claims Taiwan</strong> as its territory and underlined its opposition to official exchanges like Mr. Azar’s visit by sending two fighter jets toward the island, briefly crossing the median line in the strait separating mainland China and Taiwan, just before the talks.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Mr. Azar’s trip,</strong> the highest-level visit to Taiwan by an American official since Washington severed official ties with the island in 1979, pointed to the increasingly important role Taiwan will play in a brewing ideological battle between the two superpowers.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Taiwan and the United States</strong> have frequently framed their alliance as one based on “shared democratic values,” and China’s reaction was a reminder of the risks the island faces as it seeks a stronger relationship with Washington.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘To Taiwan,</strong> the trip is a diplomatic coup and an opportunity to showcase its widely praised response to the virus, which it achieved despite efforts by China to diplomatically isolate the island.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Ms. Tsai,</strong> in remarks welcoming Mr. Azar, said his visit showed that relations between the two sides “have never been better.” ’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘To Beijing,</strong> the visit is considered yet another provocation from the United States at the most volatile time in the bilateral relationship in decades.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The ruling Communist Party</strong> sees the interactions between Taiwan and Washington as a challenge to its sovereignty and in defiance of its threats to unify the island with the mainland by force.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘To the Trump administration,</strong> Mr. Azar’s visit is a chance to take a jab at China, which has sought to spin the coronavirus crisis as a testament to the strength of its authoritarian system.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘It is a way for Washington</strong> to show that it backs Taiwan in the face of increasing efforts by China to keep the island off the international stage.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">' “It is a true honor</strong> to be here to convey a message of strong support and friendship from President Trump to Taiwan,” Mr. Azar said in remarks at the Taiwanese presidential office before heading into a meeting with Ms. Tsai.'&nbsp;</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">' “Taiwan’s response</strong> to Covid-19 has been among the most successful in the world, and that is a tribute to the open, transparent, democratic nature of Taiwan’s society and culture.” '</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="height:40px; font-size:0; background-color:#f6f6f6;">&nbsp;                </td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5Gb7dA?track_p_id=06nGzGg_ev1tygwTnaRRzVX" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/p8Mr_cZOFApn0lBA1EmOyEi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5Gb7dA?track_p_id=1h6nGzGg_YeqojC2Lq6Kap5" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Edging Towards China's Redline on Taiwan</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5Gb7dA?track_p_id=diuVAP4%40GbGHKL6nGzGg_BU" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/bA4eXEEp5LdJVB-5uvFxk0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5Gb7dA?track_p_id=2UG6nGzGg_U2rwWlJWiIWyu" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Edging Towards China's Redline on Taiwan</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">France24</strong></h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">“The fact that they didn’t choose to send a national security advisor or someone else suggests they are trying to come as close as possible to China’s red line but don’t want to cross it.”</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Throughout the 1990s</strong> the United States sent trade officials to Taiwan with regularity.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Douglas Paal,</strong> a former head of the American Institute in Taiwan, Washington’s de facto embassy, said the Trump administration was still paying heed to China’s red line—that no US official handling national security visit Taiwan.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The difference this time,</strong> he said, is the context, with Azar traveling at a time when relations between Washington and Beijing have hit a new low.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">' “Sending him to Taiwan</strong> shows respect for the old framework while putting a finger in China’s eye at the same time,” Paal said.'</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">' “The fact that they didn’t choose</strong> to send a national security advisor or someone else suggests they are trying to come as close as possible to China’s red line but don’t want to cross it.” '</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:40px auto 0 auto;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align:center; display:block; padding:10px; background-color:#c80000; font-size: 1.375em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#ffffff; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: 0px; line-height:1.35em; border-bottom:0px solid #f5f5f5;">5. China E-commerce</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/4nRAGG?track_p_id=9RtBuYXSZk5WSX7O_lx6234" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/ogPnTthZroUUftnKTlBoGEi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/4nRAGG?track_p_id=4vgQS5WSX7O_cd3DZHCZzYa" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">China's Major E-commerce Platforms</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; padding-bottom:0px;"><tbody><tr><td><img width="100%" src="https://img.scoop.it/jZndVWuARIoT65lP0WbTpDl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBXdhNIf0Yl8YfRAVzhohB7e"></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><h1 style="text-align: left;display: inline-block;font-size: 1.35em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;line-height: 1.35em;font-weight: normal;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;color: #001544;letter-spacing: -0.1px;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Cheng Li</strong></h1></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6l8gHQ?track_p_id=ck3k5uMgChGvW6UmZJ8_eqP" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/-UodRTBu_jvItnQ302lnC0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6l8gHQ?track_p_id=7URNbM5E6UmZJ8_YI35kvLJ" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Will China’s E-commerce Reshape a Reopening World? –</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">The Cairo Review of Global Affairs</strong></h3><h3 style="display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Cheng Li &amp; Ryan McElveen</strong> | Brookings</h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘If not for the pandemic, China’s tech giants would not have innovated so quickly.’</strong></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘In the early months of 2020,</strong> there was an unassailable advancement of China’s e-commerce platforms while many other sectors of the Chinese economy lay dormant.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘While online sales</strong> dropped 0.8 percent overall when comparing the first quarters of 2019 and 2020, a broader comparison between those first quarters shows impressive year-on-year increases in several categories.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘For example</strong>, sales grew in physical commodities overall (by 5.9 percent); agriculture products (by 31 percent); fresh food (by 70 percent); and household necessities, including kitchenware and fitness equipment (by 40 percent).’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The growth</strong> in these categories was made possible by the creative innovations of e-commerce platforms as well as their ability to keep consumers and employees safe.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘If not for the pandemic,</strong> China’s tech giants would not have innovated so quickly.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Similarly,</strong> the government would not have moved so quickly to support their advancements, nor would their innovations have been as widely adopted by society.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Their adaptation and success</strong> during the pandemic have been helped by the fact that they:’</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘1) prioritized the health</strong> of their customers and employees by employing subsidies and price freezes on products and implementing safe delivery processes:’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘To deliver items</strong> to harder-to-reach places, firms ramped up the use of drones and self-driving vehicles.’&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘JD.com also employed its smart vehicles</strong> by&nbsp;sending them to the locked-down Wuhan border, where they were remotely operated from Beijing to make urgent deliveries.’&nbsp;</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘2) allowed easier access to medical services</strong> by promoting telemedicine and creating COVID-19 test booking platforms:’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Beginning in 2019,</strong> the government removed its ban on online sales of prescription drugs, and, during the coronavirus outbreak, allowed telemedicine services to both diagnose and treat patients.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘3) connected and networked communities</strong> by increasing the adoption of online education and livestreaming platforms:’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Growth in online education</strong> has vastly outpaced expectations because of the pandemic, and the sector is expected to grow 12.3 percent to $61.5 billion this year.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Perhaps most significant for China’s economy,</strong> livestreaming has generated new sales channels for small merchants,&nbsp;enabling live interaction through which sellers can showcase their products—like clothes, food, and cosmetics—and personally respond to audience questions.’&nbsp;</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Not all of China’s e-commerce advancements</strong> have been positive from the perspective of civil liberties and privacy protection.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘They have laid bare</strong> the precarious nature of the close relationship between the government and tech companies.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Perhaps most disconcertingly,</strong> data privacy is becoming an even greater concern given reports that, during the outbreak, Alibaba’s Ant Financial and Tencent&nbsp;<a href="https://qz.com/1860453/chinese-city-will-use-health-scores-for-citizens-even-after-covid-19/" rel="nofollow" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;">developed</a>&nbsp;an app utilizing digital barcodes to help the government control the movement of people.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘This feature</strong> will continue to live on in the Alipay and WeChat platforms as COVID-19 recedes and the country reopens.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="height:40px; font-size:0; background-color:#f6f6f6;">&nbsp;                </td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6l8gHQ?track_p_id=06UmZJ8_XXC65Fu%40FYYKRVG" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/ogPnTthZroUUftnKTlBoGEi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/6l8gHQ?track_p_id=6SQhIru6UmZJ8_sVRWf1w6X" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">'Will China’s E-commerce Reshape a Reopening World?' </a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; padding-bottom:20px;"><tbody><tr><td><img width="100%" src="https://img.scoop.it/smqDPl8ZmnHw6lVF_ot7_zl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBXdhNIf0Yl8YfRAVzhohB7e"></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/4nRAGG?track_p_id=05WSX7O_n4N5x5NPkra2FG6" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/-UodRTBu_jvItnQ302lnC0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/4nRAGG?track_p_id=avTz1TN5rUG5WSX7O_lu1UI" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">China's Major E-commerce Platforms</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">The Cairo Review of Global Affairs</strong></h3><h3 style="display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Cheng Li &amp; Ryan McElveen</strong> | Brookings</h3><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;">‘<strong style="font-weight: bold">The major e-commerce platforms</strong> in China today have expanded to include:</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Suning </strong>(1990), which has 1,600 brick-and-mortar stores around the country and sells&nbsp;physical merchandise, ranging from home appliances to baby care products;’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘JD.com or Jingdong&nbsp;</strong>(1998), which is a business-to-consumer marketplace that purchases inventory from brands and operates its own logistics chain;’&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Tencent&nbsp;</strong>(1998), which developed the social media app WeChat and the WeChat mobile payment system and has financial stakes in JD.com, Meituan, and Pinduoduo;’&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Alibaba&nbsp;</strong>(1999), which developed the Alipay (Ant Financial) mobile payment system and has two major online retailers: Taobao and Tmall. Taobao was modeled on eBay as a consumer-to-consumer marketplace, whereas Alibaba’s Tmall was established as a business-to-consumer marketplace hosting local and international businesses;’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘ByteDance </strong>(2012), which is one of the newest entrants to e-commerce and plans to sell products through its internationally-renowned apps, Toutiao and Douyin (Tiktok). Tiktok, which allows users to share short videos and has become particularly popular during the global lockdown, has more than eight hundred million users;’&nbsp;</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Meituan-Dianping&nbsp;</strong>(2015),which is&nbsp;a merger of Groupon-like voucher sellers Meituan and Dianping and combines food delivery; restaurant, entertainment, and travel booking; and customer reviews into one universal&nbsp;online-to-offline&nbsp;platform; and’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Pinduoduo&nbsp;</strong>(2015), which has become widely used in rural areas for its combination of bargain shopping, gaming, and social media, is the largest interactive e-commerce platform in the world and has overtaken JD.com to become the second largest e-commerce site in China behind Taobao.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div></td></tr></tbody></table>

<table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%" style="background-color:#f5f5f5; text-align:center; overflow:hidden"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><div><link href="https://fonts.googleapis.com/css2?family=Merriweather:wght@900&amp;display=swap" rel="stylesheet"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; background-color:#fff;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5%; text-align:left; font-weight:700; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; line-height: 20px;"><span style="font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 17px; color: #c80000;">CHINA</span><span style="font-family: 'Merriweather', serif; font-size: 15.5px; color: #001544;">Debate</span></td><td style="padding:3.5%; text-align:right; font-weight:normal; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal;color: #001544; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;"></td></tr></tbody></table><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5%; text-align:center;"><a style="border-bottom: none;text-decoration: none;color: #001544;" href="https://www.chinadebate.com/china-macro-reporter/archive" target="_blank"><img style="width:70px; border-radius:3%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19);" src="https://assets-global.website-files.com/5a3e922cf6b9a40001bc2d6b/5e3dbbf161e6c357b022bea5_China%20Macro%20Reporter%20.png" alt="China_Macro_Reporter"></a></td></tr><tr><td style="text-align:center; font-size: 27px; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#001544; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: -0.5px; line-height: 1;">China Macro Reporter</td></tr><tr><td style="text-align:center; line-height:1.5; padding-bottom:35px; padding-top:10px; font-size: 13px; color:#001544; font-family:'gordita', sans-serif;">By Malcolm Riddell<span style="margin:0 6px">·</span>August 1, 2020</td></tr><tr><td style="text-align:center; line-height:1.5; display:block; max-width:480px; margin:0 auto; padding:7px 0; font-size: 1.175em; font-family: Georgia, serif; color:#c80000; font-weight:normal; letter-spacing: -0.5px; border-bottom:2px solid #c80000;">Opening Statement</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/8vPTpw?track_p_id=6Mm1GV18T5oDu_qolzrpVss" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/4x73lYAycA6tlG4fEtV_j0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/8vPTpw?track_p_id=6F33KYw8T5oDu_BdfdT1roX" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">A Democracy Worth Defending</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/8vPTpw?track_p_id=82jXv1Ykc8T5oDu_ffLce1Y" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/L8OYZRgVctWBHRpd_Kqh4Ei__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/8vPTpw?track_p_id=4dV6F8T5oDu_T2pxsyF5dr4" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">A Democracy Worth Defending</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h1 style="display: inline-block;font-size: 1.35em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;line-height: 1.35em;font-weight: normal;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;color: #001544;letter-spacing: -0.1px;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Greetings!</strong></h1><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><br></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><span style="color: #d0021b"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">It’s August,</strong></em></span><span style="color: #d0021b"><em style="font-style: italic"> and from now until Labor Day, the China Macro Reporter will publish less often and have fewer posts.</em></span></p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><span style="color: #d0021b"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">But if some big things happen,</strong></em></span><span style="color: #d0021b"><em style="font-style: italic"> we’ll bring you the analyses you need to understand those events.</em></span></li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">On July 30,</strong> Taiwan’s first elected president, Lee Teng-hui died.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">His predecessor,</strong> the unelected and dictatorial president, Chiang Ching-kuo, began reforms (under not a little pressure from the Reagan administration), but it was Mr. Lee who led Taiwan to become a democracy.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">When Mr Chiang died</strong> in 1988, his vice-president, Mr. Lee, succeeded him as president, the path to democracy was far from clear.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Conservative elements</strong> of ruling Kuomintang Party (KMT) had aimed to hinder or at least slow walk moves to popular elections.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">The KMT</strong> had ruled Mainland China until its defeat by the Chinese Communist Party in 1949 and continued that rule after escaping to Taiwan.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">For those conservatives,</strong> popular elections meant losing power.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Despite that opposition,</strong> Taiwan did have elections.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">And in 1996,</strong> Lee was elected president.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">As he wrote</strong> in <em style="font-style: italic">Foreign Affairs</em> in 1999:</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Democratic development</strong> in Taiwan has now reached the point of no return.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The people of Taiwan</strong> would never countenance any less-representative form of government.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Fast forward to today:</strong> Taiwan has long passed that point of new return.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">It has a vibrant,</strong> if raucous (think fistfights and pile-ons in the Legislative Yuan), democracy.</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">A democracy</strong> that will endure unless the People’s Republic of China achieves reunification by military force while the U.S. stands by.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">For some time now</strong> the PRC has taken up the foreign policy space in the United States that Taiwan once occupied.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">For some policymakers</strong> – especially those who didn’t live through Taiwan’s peaceful transition from dictatorship to democracy – Taiwan is a bit of a nuisance, complicating U.S. policy with China.</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">For them, </strong>defending Taiwan from an unprovoked PRC attack is folly.</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">They are wrong.</strong></li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">So my purpose here</strong> today is put us in a time-machine that takes us back to the era when Taiwan made the transition to democracy to give a feel for the difficulties and the stakes that were involved.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">And to rekindle our appreciation</strong> for what a precious thing Taiwan democracy is.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">&nbsp;</strong></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">I lived in Taiwan</strong> in the 1980s and 1990s during this transition.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Being on hand</strong> at the birth of a democracy is perhaps my most treasured experience.</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">I even</strong> had a bit part.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Taiwan’s Wall Street Journal </strong>asked me to write a finance column.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">At first</strong> I wrote about M&amp;A, foreign investment, and the like.</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">But catching the enthusiasm of the era,</strong> I veered into commentary about and criticism of the KMT and the government.</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">The column was so popular</strong> that the paper continued to run it without demanding that I return to more benign topics.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">That popularity</strong> brought me requests for meetings from government officials and cabinet ministers (including Minister of Foreign Affairs, Frederick Chien, whose essay in included below) to discuss what reforms Taiwan needed and, frankly, to try to coopt me to their points of view.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">A few years</strong> before, my encounters with officials might have been their escorting me to jail or at least to the airport.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;">&nbsp;</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Other than the recent obituary of Lee Teng-hui,</strong> the posts below – our time-machine - were written during the transition.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">One, as mentioned,</strong> is by Frederick Chien; another by Lee Teng-hui himself; and the third by an observer from the U.S. – all from <em style="font-style: italic">Foreign Affairs</em>.</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">While they may seem arcane</strong> and too much inside baseball, I encourage you to have a look – and perhaps to click and read the entire essays.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">&nbsp;</strong></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">As U.S.-China</strong> relations deteriorate and Xi Jinping becomes more assertive, the question of whether or not the U.S. should defend Taiwan from an unprovoked PRC attack could quickly become front and center.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">My hope</strong> is that a better understanding of <em style="font-style: italic">how</em> Taiwan became a democracy will lead you to conclude or to reaffirm your conviction that Taiwan is worthy of U.S. defense.</li></ul><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Go deeper into these issues - Browse the posts below.</strong></h2><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">To read the original article, click the title.</strong></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Let me know what you think. </strong>And please forward the <strong style="font-weight: bold">China Macro Reporter</strong> to your friends and colleagues.</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">All the best,</strong></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Malcolm</strong></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div></td></tr><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><div></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:40px auto 0 auto;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align:center; display:block; padding:10px; background-color:#c80000; font-size: 1.375em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#ffffff; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: 0px; line-height:1.35em; border-bottom:0px solid #f5f5f5;">1. The Death of a Hero</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/7weY3E?track_p_id=5LwpVe73naYw_ifr2IdRiFy" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/3QKIJ28TXRxlm_PNLipujEi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/7weY3E?track_p_id=cxDVojxmVjiVa73naYw_BeM" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">2020: 'Lee Teng-hui, 97, Who Led Taiwan’s Turn to Democracy, Dies'</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; padding-bottom:10px;"><tbody><tr><td><img width="100%" src="https://img.scoop.it/yFphxEfwPePmOC_d_T40YDl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBXdhNIf0Yl8YfRAVzhohB7e"></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff;padding-bottom:20px;"><tbody><tr><td style="font-size: 1em; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans; text-align:center; color: #001540; font-weight:600; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5em; font-style:italic;">from Time June 19, 1995                           <br>and the Chinese missiles flew in the Third Taiwan Straits Crisis                        </td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/7weY3E?track_p_id=4UlQY73naYw_vvpdRQQzVqy" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/h-nkptRmU1cQTIlqQz4UxUi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/7weY3E?track_p_id=073naYw_ed3hK5T4ZVFE2PK" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Lee Teng-hui, 97, Who Led Taiwan’s Turn to Democracy, Dies&nbsp;</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">The New York Times</strong></h3><h3 style="display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Jonathan Kandell</strong></h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">'Its first popularly elected president, Lee Teng-hui transformed a police state into a vibrant country while angering Beijing by insisting that Taiwan be treated as a sovereign state.'</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">July 30, 2020</strong></em></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Lee Teng-hui,</strong> who as president of Taiwan led its transformation from an island in the grip of authoritarian rule to one of Asia’s most vibrant and prosperous democracies, died on Thursday in Taipei, the capital. He was 97.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘As president</strong> from 1988 to 2000 — the first to be elected by popular vote in Taiwan.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Mr. Lee entered Taiwan’s politics</strong> during the dictatorial Nationalist Party regimes of Chiang Kai-shek and his son Chiang Ching-kuo, who assumed power after his father’s death in 1975.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The Nationalists</strong> ruled with brutality, which reached a peak in 1947 with what became known as the February 28 incident, in which up to 28,000 Taiwanese were massacred by Chiang Kai-shek’s troops in response to street protests.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The Nationalists</strong> imposed martial law two years later, and it was not lifted until 1987 by Chiang Ching-kuo.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘With Chiang Ching-kuo</strong> installed as president, Mr. Lee was appointed mayor of Taipei in 1978 and set about modernizing the capital’s road and sewer systems.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘As governor of Taiwan Province</strong>, from 1981 to 1984, he pushed agrarian reforms that helped achieve a balanced growth between urban and rural areas, still a hallmark of Taiwan.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Mr. Chiang selected Mr. Lee</strong> as his vice president in 1984.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘It was a dramatic departure</strong> from the usual practice of appointing only former mainland Chinese to top government posts.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘His selection</strong> was viewed as a gesture toward the native Taiwanese, who had been politically powerless despite accounting for 85 percent of the population.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘When Chiang Ching-kuo</strong> died of a heart attack in 1988, Mr. Lee succeeded him, becoming the first native Taiwanese president.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘He moved to break</strong> with the Chiang family’s autocratic system, publicly deploring the February 28 massacres.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Mr. Lee dismantled the dictatorship</strong> and worked to end the animosity between those born on the mainland and the native Taiwanese.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘He pushed</strong> the concept of “New Taiwanese,” a term suggesting that the islanders, no matter their backgrounds, were forging a common identity based on a democratic political system and growing prosperity.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘He ended decades</strong> of state-of-emergency measures, allowed citizens to send mail to mainland relatives and visit them, dropped bans on street demonstrations, eased press restrictions, promoted a multiparty system and decreed open elections for the National Assembly.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘He pursued</strong> a deliberately ambiguous policy with mainland China, shifting between rigid hostility, tentative conciliation and defiant independence.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘His attempts</strong> to demonstrate Taiwan’s international sovereignty sometimes provoked the mainland into saber-rattling military exercises.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Mr. Lee was elected outright in 1996,</strong> in Taiwan’s first open presidential contest.’</p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Seeking to begin a dialogue with Beijing,</strong> he supported a policy of “one China, two equal governments.” ’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘But he insisted</strong> that Taiwan would rejoin the mainland only if China became a democratic, capitalist society.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘In the meantime</strong> he again called for “state to state” relations between Taipei and Beijing, a policy that the mainland rejected. Instead, Chinese officials tried to persuade other countries to cut all ties with Taiwan, asserting that any improvement in relations would come only after Mr. Lee had retired.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Taiwan became a separate political entity in 1949</strong> after the civil war in China brought Mao’s Communists to power, forcing Chiang’s defeated government to flee to the island, some 100 miles from the mainland.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘For the next 30 years,</strong> Taiwan, with American support, maintained the fiction that it was the seat of China’s legitimate government in exile.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Washington finally recognized</strong> the Communist government in Beijing in 1979 and severed its formal diplomatic relations with Taiwan.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘But it continued</strong> to guarantee Taiwan’s security against a mainland invasion and backed negotiations between both sides aimed at reunification’.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:40px auto 0 auto;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align:center; display:block; padding:10px; background-color:#c80000; font-size: 1.375em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#ffffff; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: 0px; line-height:1.35em; border-bottom:0px solid #f5f5f5;">2. Liberalization Begins</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5QxZCq?track_p_id=9jGXdZKLVy8TEbmw_cIFnOl" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/2P2LxiV-sg54VayqL9X2F0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5QxZCq?track_p_id=2Am8TEbmw_PNMErdIqovCQJ" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">1988: 'Taiwan After Chiang Ching-kuo'</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; padding-bottom:20px;"><tbody><tr><td><img width="100%" src="https://img.scoop.it/8dtrRkbfu9eaf_Pz6BASTTl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBXdhNIf0Yl8YfRAVzhohB7e"></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5QxZCq?track_p_id=3T1m8TEbmw_BYvmXhql1rRJ" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/FTMDU--riaGigEWYzk1HBki__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/5QxZCq?track_p_id=3L2A8TEbmw_53ZoxZpGAg%40C" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Taiwan After Chiang Ching-kuo</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Foreign Affairs</strong></h3><h3 style="display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Selig S. Harrison</strong> | Carnegie Endowment</h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Above all, Chiang Ching-kuo recognized the need to make political concessions to a rising middle class and Taiwan-born majority that resents domination by the Kuomintang (Nationalist Party) in-group of post-1945 mainland immigrants.’</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Foreign Affairs, </strong></em><strong style="font-weight: bold">Spring 1988</strong></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The uncertain outlook in Taipei</strong> following the death of President Chiang Ching-kuo [“C.C.K.”] on January 13, 1988, has underlined the dilemmas confronting American policymakers as they seek to develop stable ties with the People’s Republic of China while at the same time fulfilling U.S. obligations to Taiwan.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘When the United States and China </strong>established diplomatic relations nine years ago, they were able to paper over their differences on the future of Taiwan.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Increasingly,</strong> however, this sensitive problem has become a focal point of conflict between Washington and Beijing.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘ "C.C.K.,"</strong> who became president three years after the death of his father, Chiang Kai-shek, directed a remarkable transformation during his ten years in the presidency and an earlier 13-year apprenticeship as defense minister, vice premier and premier.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘He accelerated the process of modernization</strong> that has given Taiwan a 13-percent growth rate, an annual per capita income of $4,600 and foreign exchange reserves of $76 billion, the world’s second largest.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Adapting with surprising ease </strong>to the role of politician, Chiang shed the hard-line image acquired as army political commissar and secret police chief from 1950 to 1965.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘He developed a folksy political style;</strong> a baseball cap and turtleneck sweater became his trademark.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Above all,</strong> he recognized the need to make political concessions to a rising middle class and Taiwan-born majority that resents domination by the Kuomintang (Nationalist Party) in-group of post-1945 mainland immigrants.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘His death</strong> came just as he was beginning to liberalize the political process in the face of stiff conservative resistance.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘In December 1985</strong> the late president formally announced that it would be incompatible with the constitution for a member of his family or a military officer to succeed him.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘His choice as successor,</strong> 64-year-old technocrat Lee Teng-hui, a Cornell-trained agricultural economist, has been on the Kuomintang Standing Committee since 1979 and was appointed vice president in 1984.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘In naming Lee,</strong> Chiang Ching-kuo did not disturb the authoritarian institutional structure of KMT rule, in which the armed forces, the intelligence services and the powerful presidential secretariat share power with the nominal party leadership.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Lee enjoys strong public support</strong> as the first native Taiwanese to hold the presidency.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘However,</strong> he has no political base of his own.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Chiang Ching-kuo’s liberalization moves</strong> produced a major change in the atmosphere but relatively limited concrete results.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘His most popular reform</strong> gives civilians accused of national security offenses the right to be tried in civilian rather than military courts.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘When the Democratic Progressive Party surfaced,</strong> he took the unprecedented step of permitting it to compete openly in the 1986 elections.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘But the government</strong> has yet to adopt formal legislation authorizing opposition parties.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Martial law</strong> was lifted in July 1987, a symbolic step of great importance, but a new national security law keeps the substance of martial law restrictions largely intact.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Critics emphasize</strong> that ubiquitous KMT political commissars keep a watchful eye on the bureaucracy, the military, the educational system and the press.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘So far the government</strong> has failed to fulfill promises to liberalize regulations that keep the opposition from starting new newspapers and radio stations.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘When Lee Teng-hui</strong> said that direct elections would come "someday," I asked him whether they would occur within five years.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘ "Maybe five or ten years,"</strong> he replied.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Make that</strong> eight years or so.</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Lee</strong> became Taiwan’s first elected president in 1996.</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:40px auto 0 auto;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align:center; display:block; padding:10px; background-color:#c80000; font-size: 1.375em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#ffffff; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: 0px; line-height:1.35em; border-bottom:0px solid #f5f5f5;">3. From Dictatorship to Democracy</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/79cLKa?track_p_id=ailUmVh1K6f85OIrW_YUI62" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/2P2LxiV-sg54VayqL9X2F0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/79cLKa?track_p_id=9pfh1XZby485OIrW_Ilrlwi" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">1991: 'A View From Taipei'</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/79cLKa?track_p_id=cQqV2dCOB5blm85OIrW_VX2" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/UNjmiqEzo8evSLBFrvPCfUi__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/79cLKa?track_p_id=6X2Eziq85OIrW_qnmYgckmt" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">A View From Taipei</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Foreign Affairs</strong></h3><h3 style="display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Fredrick F. Chien</strong> | Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Republic</h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘It is worth noting that the R.O.C. is the first Chinese-dominated society to practice pluralistic party politics. In that sense what we have been witnessing is truly revolutionary.’</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Foreign Affairs, </strong></em><strong style="font-weight: bold">Winter 1991/92</strong></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Since 1949</strong> Taiwan has made slow progress toward democratization, the timing and direction of which was narrowly controlled by the government.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘By the mid-1980s</strong> Taiwan and Singapore had become the only non-oil exporting countries in the world with per capita incomes of at least $5,000 a year that did not have fully competitive democratic systems.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘But today Taiwan</strong> has finally developed the proper economic and social base for successful democracy.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘An important step</strong> toward Taiwan's political reform came in 1986, when opposition forces formed the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), defying a government ban on new political parties.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The ruling Kuomintang (KMT, or Nationalist Party)</strong> not only refrained from taking action against the opposition but made a series of moves in the following years that decidedly liberalized and democratized the nature of Taiwan's political system.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The liberalization</strong> measures adopted by the KMT included replacing martial law with a new national security law, lifting press restrictions, revamping the judiciary and promulgating laws on assembly, demonstration and civil organization.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The democratization measures</strong> legalized opposition parties, redefined the rules for political participation-such as the electoral law-and include the ongoing reform of the legislature (the Legislative Yuan), the electoral college (the National Assembly) and the R.O.C. constitution.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘This process of democratization,</strong> begun by President Chiang Ching-kuo before his death in January 1988, was given further impetus by his successor, Dr. Lee Teng-hui.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘At his inauguration in May 1990,</strong> President Lee set a two-year timetable to complete the country's democratic transformation, including major structural and procedural reforms.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘A National Affairs Conference</strong> was convened in June 1990 with delegates drawn from all major political and social forces.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘After much public debate</strong> the NAC decided to end Taiwan's "mobilization period," begun in 1949, which had allowed the government extraordinary national security powers.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘A declaration to this effect,</strong> made by President Lee in May 1991, also included recognition that a "political entity" in Peking controls the mainland area.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘On the recommendation</strong> of the NAC the "temporary provisions" appended in May 1949 to the 1947 constitution, giving the government sweeping powers to deal with external and internal threats, were abrogated in early 1991.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘By the end of the year</strong> all the senior members of the Legislative Yuan and National Assembly elected on the mainland prior to 1949, and who have never been subject to reelection, will have retired.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘A new National Assembly</strong> composed exclusively of representatives elected in Taiwan will then undertake the final phase of democratic reform: revision of the R.O.C. constitution.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Upon its completion in mid-1992,</strong> and after Legislative Yuan elections scheduled for the end of that same year, the R.O.C. will have become by any standard a full-fledged democracy.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The R.O.C.'s democratization process</strong> is unique.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘It has not been initiated</strong> or monitored by external forces, as it was in Japan and West Germany.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Nor was it undertaken</strong> after political or social upheavals, as in Greece or Argentina and lately in the Soviet Union.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Rather it has evolved peacefully</strong> within the country and is mainly the result of prosperity.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘But the point</strong> is that the government of the R.O.C. itself has largely set the timing for its own democratization; the clock cannot and will not be turned back.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘It is worth noting</strong> that the R.O.C. is the first Chinese-dominated society to practice pluralistic party politics.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘In that sense</strong> what we have been witnessing is truly revolutionary.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘It realizes the dreams</strong> of many of our founding fathers-a dream for which many have sacrificed their lives.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘And yet R.O.C. prosperity and democratization</strong> have been achieved without bloodshed and without overturning the existing socioeconomic order.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:40px auto 0 auto;"><tbody><tr><td style="text-align:center; display:block; padding:10px; background-color:#c80000; font-size: 1.375em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color:#ffffff; font-weight:bold; letter-spacing: 0px; line-height:1.35em; border-bottom:0px solid #f5f5f5;">4. Taiwan's Imperfect Democracy</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; border-top:solid 1px #ccc;"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:3.5% 3% 3% 3%"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:block; padding-top:10px;"><a href="http://sco.lt/7l5OV6?track_p_id=1Z75rkQ2_MGe%40I6lZMQp3j1" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/2P2LxiV-sg54VayqL9X2F0i__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/7l5OV6?track_p_id=cNf32MynhnamF75rkQ2_JS3" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.7; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">1999: 'Understanding Taiwan: Bridging the Perception Gap'</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff; padding-bottom:10px;"><tbody><tr><td><img width="100%" src="https://img.scoop.it/Ux6MEgQsgk-OHVNPPmWjLjl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBXdhNIf0Yl8YfRAVzhohB7e"></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td style="max-width:600px"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff;padding-bottom:20px;"><tbody><tr><td style="font-size: 1em; font-family: 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans; text-align:center; color: #001540; font-weight:600; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5em; font-style:italic;">‘Of course, democracy on Taiwan is hardly perfect.’<br>                          Not another brawl in the Legislative Yuan                        </td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr></tbody></table></div><div><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" style="max-width:600px; width:100%; margin:0 auto; text-align:left; background:#fff"><tbody><tr><td style="padding:0"><table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" width="100%"><tbody><tr><td width="50px" style="display:none;"><a href="http://sco.lt/7l5OV6?track_p_id=6e6UKAa75rkQ2_Io4h23fZH" target="_blank" title="SourceLogo" style="color: #001544;text-decoration: none;border-bottom: 2px solid #008dc8;"><img height="50px" width="auto" alt="SourceLogo" src="https://img.scoop.it/FTMDU--riaGigEWYzk1HBki__cjguAuwrRM5-qsdIhQ=" style="display:block; overflow:hidden; border: 1px solid #ddd; border-radius:10%; box-shadow: 0 4px 8px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2), 0 2px 6px 0 rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.19); width:auto;"></a></td><td width="100%" style="display:none; padding-left:5%;"><a href="http://sco.lt/7l5OV6?track_p_id=bHMroO4Epq6A75rkQ2_eFdd" style="color:#001544; font-size:1.3em; font-weight:bold; font-family: Georgia, serif; letter-spacing: -0.1px; line-height: 1.5; text-decoration: none; border-bottom:none;" target="_blank">Understanding Taiwan: Bridging the Perception Gap</a></td></tr></tbody></table></td></tr><tr><td style="height:0px; font-size:0">&nbsp;</td></tr><tr><td style="padding:0 3.5%; font-size: 1em; font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif; color: #001544; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing:-0.1px;"><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p><h3 style="text-align: right;display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Foreign Affairs</strong></h3><h3 style="display: block;font-size: 0.85em;margin-top: 0em;margin-bottom: 0.3em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #5d5d5d;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.35em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Lee Teng-hui</strong> | President of the Republic of China</h3><h2 style="text-align: center;display: block;font-size: 1.15em;margin-top: 1em;margin-bottom: 1em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-weight: normal;font-family: Georgia, serif;color: #c80000;border-top: 0px solid #ddd;padding: 0.5em 3.5% 0.5em 3.0%;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;background-color: #f5f5f5;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Of course, democracy on Taiwan is hardly perfect.’</strong></em></h2><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><em style="font-style: italic"><strong style="font-weight: bold">Foreign Affairs, </strong></em><strong style="font-weight: bold">September 1999</strong></p><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Democratic development</strong> in Taiwan has now reached the point of no return.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘The people of Taiwan</strong> would never countenance any less-representative form of government.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Of course,</strong> democracy on Taiwan is hardly perfect.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘No democratic system is.’</strong></li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Having achieved full democracy</strong> in only one decade, the R.O.C. is still in the process of deepening and consolidating its system.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Traditional social values</strong> have been discarded while new ones have yet to take hold.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Taiwan is engaging</strong> in educational and spiritual reform to improve the quality of life by promoting cultural development, teaching new virtues and values while rediscovering traditional ones, and developing the sense of civic and social responsibility.’</li><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘Only nations</strong> willing to relinquish the known certainties of old-style authoritarianism for the unknowns of modern democracy can ultimately enjoy the flexibility, efficiency, and transparency necessary to meet the competitive challenges of globalization sweeping the world today.’</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘What Taiwan has done in the past decade</strong> is remarkable for the speed and scope of its economic and political changes and for the peaceful way in which such changes have been achieved.’</p><ul style="margin-top: 0px;margin-bottom: 0.5;"><li style="margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0em;"><strong style="font-weight: bold">‘It is in the best interest</strong> of regional and even global peace and stability for Beijing to embrace democracy rather than try to contain it.'</li></ul><p style="display: block;margin-top: 0.5em;margin-bottom: 0.5em;margin-left: 0;margin-right: 0;font-size: 1em;font-weight: normal;letter-spacing: -0.1px;line-height: 1.5em;color: #001544;font-family: gorditamedium, sans-serif;"></p></td></tr><tr><td style="height:10px; font-size:0; border-bottom:10px solid #fff;">&nbsp;</td></tr></tbody></table></div><div></div></td></tr></tbody></table>

‘Wall Street will be the next US-China battleground’
August 1, 2019
1. TRADE TALKS
2. BEYOND THE TRADE WAR
3. HONG KONG
4. GEO-POLITICS
5. ECONOMY
6. ONLINE BANKING
7. MANUFACTURING LEAVING CHINA
8. CHINESE INVESTMENT IN THE U.S.
‘China’s continuing drag on the global economy’
June 27, 2019
1. ‘The Value of Global China’: McKinsey
2. China's Maritime Militias in the ‘Gray Zone’
3. ‘The Failures of the “Failure of Engagement” with China’
4. Hardline trade minister joins China’s negotiating team
5. ‘The Continuing Chinese Drag on the Global Economy’
‘Does China rule the Fortune 500?’
July 24, 2019
1. ‘Who Likes Facebook's Libra Currency? Not the Chinese.’
2. ‘Does China rule the Fortune 500?’ Pro & Con
3. ‘China's Private Firms Continue to Struggle’: Nick Lardy
4. ‘Does China’s “Invisible Hand” Steer Funds to State-Owned Firms?’
5. ‘Party Loyalty in China Helps Private Companies Get Cheaper Loans’
6. 'Why the United States doesn’t need to return to a gentler China policy'
'China’s State-Driven Growth Model Is Running Out of Gas'
July 20, 2019
1. Trade war fallout not crushing China’s economy: Stephen Roach
2. ‘Trump tries to woo Federal Reserve in China trade fight’
3. ‘China’s State-Driven Growth Model Is Running Out of Gas’
4. ‘U.S.-China Trade: If We Get to Yes, Will It Make Any Difference?’
5. ‘Who Actually Pays Tariffs?’
6. ‘Is China Weakening the Yuan to Fight U.S. Tariffs?’
7. ‘China’s Exchange Rate Policy Woes’
China’s slowing economy not caused by trade war
July 17, 2019
1. China’s slowing economy not caused by trade war
2. China’s economy doing better than latest numbers
3. ‘China’s global business footprint shrinks’: China Global Investment Tracker (CGIT)
4. China: ‘The Art of Wait and See’
5. Why China Still Needs Hong Kong
‘U.S.-China Positions Have Hardened’
July 13, 2019
1. ‘U.S.-China Positions Have Hardened’
2. Impact of tariffs on business decisions: Richmond Fed President
3. ‘China tariffs: We can do better’
4. “Who Knew Trump Would Offer A Truce With Xi?”: The Mystery Of The Wall Street Trump Trades
5. ‘Trump’s tariff claims are demonstrably false. Here’s why.’
6. 'Is the China model a threat?'
‘How China Failed to Fail’
July 10, 2019
1. ‘Graphic Truth: China Since Tiananmen’
2. Secretary Pompeo’s two-prong China strategy
3. ‘The Fed Is Trump’s Secret Ally in the Trade War’
4. ‘Should China help secure the Strait of Hormuz?’
5. ‘Why I’ve Lost Faith in China’s Private Sector’: Shuli Ren, Bloomberg
6. ‘How China Failed to Fail: Can China’s Glass Remain Both Half Full and Half Empty?’
'China Is Not An Enemy'
July 6, 2019
1. ‘China is not an enemy’
2. Alipay & WeChat: China’s retail payment revolution
3. Can Facebook’s Libra replicate WeChat Pay’s digital payment dominance?
4. 'Hong Kong Has Nothing Left to Lose'
Trade war: 'Wet US-China firecracker at G20’
July 3, 2019
1. ‘What the US and China each got out of the Trump-Xi meeting in Japan.’
2. ‘Wet US-China firecracker at G20’: Derek Scissors
3. ‘Trump's “brilliant stroke” with China's Xi a win for US’: Michael Pillsbury
4. ‘The Chinese move only to the extent that it suits their domestic economic agenda.’: Kevin Rudd
5. Peter Navarro on the trade war cease fire and Huawei
6. ‘The big takeaway from this meeting is that you have a ceasefire.’: Michael Hirson, Eurasia Group
7. ‘Trump hasn’t reversed his position on Huawei’: Michael Pillsbury
8. From the World Economic Forum in Dalian China
At the G20, 'Xi still believes he has the upper hand'
June 29, 2019
1. G-20 leaders face a toxic trifecta of political instability, trade tensions and slowing global growth
2. Trump & Xi at the G20: the context
3. Trade War: Xi Still Believes He Has the Upper Hand
Xi's 'Self-reliance' - Why Blacklisting Huawei Could Backfire
June 26, 2019
1. Xi Jinping’s Trade Conundrum: Why the Chinese Leader Isn’t About to Back Down
2. Why Blacklisting Huawei Could Backfire
3. BACKGROUNDER | Huawei: China’s Controversial Tech Giant
4. Mao Redux: The Enduring Relevance of Self-reliance in China
Roubini on the U.S.-China trade war, the impact on the global economy, and the stakes at the coming G20
June 22, 2019
1. Roubini – ‘Dr. Doom’ - on the U.S.-China trade war
2. ‘The Global Consequences of a Sino-American Cold War’
3. The Coming Sino-American Bust-Up
4. The Growing Risk of a 2020 Recession and Crisis
'Trump Has Gotten China to Lower Its Tariffs. Just Toward Everyone Else.'
June 19, 2019
1. ‘America Must Prepare for the Coming Chinese Empire’: Robert Kaplan, Eurasia Group
2. 'Trump Has Gotten China to Lower Its Tariffs. Just Toward Everyone Else.'
3. ‘Services are ½ of the value-added in global trade- we just don’t see them or count them.’: David Dollar, Brookings
4. HK Protests: ‘An analysis of events’ by Nuri Vattachi + a response from a noted Greater China expert
Hong Kong Protests: 'If China doesn't back down, the U.S. will make it pay dearly.'
June 15, 2019
1. ‘People v power: The rule of law in Hong Kong’: The Economist
2. What is the proposed law that the protesters oppose?
3. ‘Plugging a loophole?’
4. ‘Hong Kong’s proposed extradition law puts ties with America at risk’: The Economist
5. ‘China Is Courting Disaster in Hong Kong’: Minxin Pei
6. CONGRESS | ‘The reaction that really matters is in Washington, D.C.’: The Economist
7. CONGRESS | Actions by the Congressional-Executive Commission on China (CECC)
8. PRESIDENT TRUMP | ‘So I hope it all works out for China and for Hong Kong.’
9. PRO | ‘There Are Huge Misconceptions About Extradition Bill.’: Ronnie Tong
10. CON | ‘My take on Hong Kong's extradition bill’: Jerry Cohen
11. CON | ‘A convenient legal tool to grab individuals deemed to be “enemies” of the Chinese state’: Minxin Pei
12. CON | President Xi Needs to tell Carrie Lam ‘no amendment now’ : Michael Pillsbury
'Not another downturn in U.S.-China relations: a paradigm shift'
June 12, 2019
1. ‘China’s rise would have eroded any hegemon’s unrivaled power, no matter how skillful its diplomacy’: Fareed Zakaria
2. ‘Not another downturn in U.S.-China relations: a paradigm shift’: Jim McGregor
3. ‘China had America right where it wanted it - and they overreached’: Jim McGregor
4. ‘China's Private Firms Continue to Struggle’: Nick Lardy
5. ‘Why is China so interested in building and buying ports?’: Deborah Bräutigam
'The Middle East has its oil, China has rare earths.’ Deng Xiaoping
June 7, 2019
1. The trade war is paralyzing business decision making.
2. Impact of tariffs on U.S. businesses in China: AmCham China chairman
3. ‘The Middle East has its oil, China has rare earths.’ Deng Xiaoping
4. Trade war: How lawyers vs economists as negotiators lead to the breakdown in talks
5. A primer on how Chinese law might enforce a US-China trade deal
6. Impact of tariffs on U.S. businesses in China: AmCham survey
The 30-year detour: The path from Tiananmen to Xi Jinping
June 4, 2019
1. ‘Tiananmen divides PRC history into before and after’
2. The 30-year detour: The path from Tiananmen to Xi Jinping
3. ‘The Party has relied on brute force since its inception’
4. Tiananmen: Reporting from ABC World News Tonight 1989
5. ‘Assignment: China - Tiananmen Square’
6. The story behind the ‘Tank Man’ photo
Peter Navarro talks tariffs on CNBC
June 1, 2019
1. Peter Navarro talks tariffs on CNBC 💣
2. Navarro : ‘The producers in Mexico and China pay for this. Here's how it works. A tariff goes on that puts pressure on the Chinese or the Mexican producers to lower their prices – otherwise they can't sell.’
3. Navarro : ‘Corporate executives are recognizing that the supply chain is better off in other places in the globe or better yet bring that here.’
4. Navarro : ‘So these people who say that somehow American consumer is going to pay for this - that's simply not true.’
5. Navarro : ‘We’ve had tariffs on dishwashers and solar panels - half of Chinese exports to this country - steel and aluminum and we see virtually no inflation.' — DISHWASHERS & SOLAR PANELS
6. Navarro : ‘We’ve had tariffs on dishwashers and solar panels - half of Chinese exports to this country - steel and aluminum. And we see virtually no inflation.’ — STEEL
‘How China Sees Trump’s Trade War’
May 29, 2019
1 ‘How China Sees Trump’s Trade War’: Victor Shih
2. Nick Lardy on the trade war, fixing capital allocations, & why China’s GDP numbers are right
3. ‘Death by China’ & Peter Navarro
Why the West is getting Xi wrong
May 22, 2019
1. How the West is getting China wrong
2. Now China's Got Its Own Anti-U.S. Trade War Song
3. ‘Trade tensions will persist until global financial imbalances are addressed’
4. ‘Five Big Myths of China's Belt and Road Initiative.’
5. Trump's 2019 Protection Could Push China Back to Smoot-Hawley Tariff Levels
6. More from Bill Overholt
Trade talks breakdown: How the U.S. misunderstands Chinese negotiating style
May 18, 2019
1. Tracing Trump's Aggressive Tariff Strategy Back to the 1980s
2. Tom Friedman explains why he agrees with Trump's China aims but not his means
3. Trade talks breakdown: How the U.S. misunderstands Chinese negotiating style
4. Trade War Won’t Dent China’s GDP
5. Comments on the U.S.-China trade war from PIIE president Adam Posen
6. China’s response: a stable or a weakened Yuan?
Sharpening the US-China trade debate
May 15, 2019
1. It's Trump vs. Xi in the China trade war — and it's personal
2. 'Reaching an agreement can only be done at the top.’
3. Sharpening the US-China trade debate
4. FACE OFF: Brookings vs. American Enterprise Institute
5. Trade war: Is the U.S. panicking due to China’s big hedge?
6. ‘The Chinese don't get this concept “earn” their way out of punitive tariffs’: Michael Pillsbury
'Trump was right to call China's bluff in the trade talks'
May 10, 2019
1. As China Trade Talks Stall, Xi Faces a Dilemma: Fold? Or Double Down?
2. 'Trump was right to call China's bluff in the trade talks': Bill Bishop
3. The US-China trade war is poised to enter the next phase
4. Tariffs on China are no substitute for a trade deal
5. China can earn its way out of Trump’s tariffs
6. Xi Jinping Wanted Global Dominance. He Overshot
7. Trade War Results in Substantial Losses for U.S.
8. Trump Could Raise Tariffs on China. Here’s How China Could Respond.
9. A year of trade losses in the U.S.-China tariff war.....—AEI
Will Trump's ‘Crazy Uncle’ strategy work this time?
May 8, 2019
1. 'Expect the president to move forward with tariffs this Friday.": Meredith Sumpter, Eurasia Group
2. Will Trump's ‘Crazy Uncle’ strategy work this time?
3. New tariffs could cost China 1% GDP: Tao Wang, UBS
4. 'Why Trump Is Raising Tariffs on China' - by Trump advisor Michael Pillsbury
5. Trump's Tariff Threat on Rest of Chinese Goods Would Hit Final Consumer Product
China Never Stopped Managing its Trade
May 4, 2019
1. China Never Stopped Managing its Trade
2. A dash of stimulus helps stabilize China’s wobbly economy
3. 'May 4th Movement': Happy 100th anniversary
4. 'How the Communist Party seized the legacy of May Fourth'
Xi's Belt and Road Reboot
May 1, 2019
1. Xi Jinping's Second Belt and Road Forum: Three Key Takeaways
2. Brooking's David Dollar on praise and criticism of Belt and Road Initiative
3. Three ways of looking at the Belt and Road Initiative
4. A Slimmer Belt and Road Is Even Scarier
5. Expert Insights | 'China&rsquo;s Belt And Road: The New Geopolitics Of Global Infrastructure Development'
6. Director's Summary | 'China&rsquo;s Belt And Road: The New Geopolitics Of Global Infrastructure Development'
7. QUIZ: How much do you know about the Belt and Road Initiative?
8. 'Durian "Little Thai" takes us on a journey along the Belt and Road'
'The State Has Dragged Down China’s Economic Growth'
April 27, 2019
1. 'The State Has Dragged Down China’s Economic Growth': Nick Lardy
2. U.S.-China trade talks: How Trump’s latest Iran sanctions decision could impact a deal
3. In US-China Trade Disputes, the WTO Usually Sides with the United States
4. Trump and the WTO: From trashing to crippling
5. 'China Growth Outlook': Credit Suisse
6. Caixin PMI has become a leading indicator of global momentum
5G: 'The US. is winning a race that no one else is running'
April 24, 2019
1. 5G: 'The U.S. is winning a race that no one else is running'
2. Department of Defense: The obstacle to U.S. winning 5G
3. China in the report
In China, Party Control Trumps the Economy
April 20, 2019
1. China's economy back on track - Not so fast
2. In China, political control trumps the economy
3. JUST OUT | 2019 OECD Economic Survey of China
4. Why the calculations that led to the trade war are wrong
'Only Trump can save China'
April 17, 2019
1. Five things to watch for in China’s new GDP data
2. 'Only Trump can save China'
3. ‘China’s land prices deserve as much attention as European industrial production or U.S. retail sales’
4 'Trump’s Foreign Policies Are Better Than They Seem'
Europe's 'new realism' at the 'EU-China Summit'
April 13, 2019
1. 'EU-China Summit': China faces a tougher Europe
2. Europe's 'new realism' at the 'EU-China Summit'
3. China's strategy for the EU
4. The EU's (possible) strategies toward China
5. VIDEO | The Heat: China-EU summit
Trade war: 'U.S. policy has changed because China has changed'
April 10, 2019
1. Trump & Kim Hangin' in Hanoi
2. Trade war: 'U.S. policy has changed because China has changed'
3. China’s leaders should study James Bond films
4. The best explanation of Xi's view on China's private sector – beat it into submission
5. Heads Up | Watch GZERO World with Ian Bremmer – terrific!
6. April 2019 Trade Bulletin
'Why China market reforms haven't worked'
April 6, 2019
1. 'We're going from an unregulated trade war with China to a regulated one.’
2. Why China's market reform isn't working
3. All is well in China's intelligence service
4. 'China's GDP could start to grow again in 5-10 years': Prof Xu Bin, CEIBS
5. Starbucks opens a new store in China every 15 hours
'China is the world’s best consumer story'
April 3, 2019
1. 'China stimulus tracker: A one-year report card' | Development Bank of Singapore (DBS)
2. 'China is the world’s best consumer story' | McKinsey
3. When will China GDP > U.S GDP?: '2030 is not a bad estimate - but so is never.'
4. Xi and Trump Miss Their Chance
An unmistakable first-quarter recovery' for China's economy
March 30, 2019
1. 'An unmistakable first-quarter recovery' for China's economy
2. China’s Bond Market Comes of Age—Sort of
3. 'The Future of China's Bond Market'
4. 'The president has taught me that tariffs have an important use in trade negotiations': Larry Kudlow
5. 'A prolonged period of radical uncertainty' - 'a major source is the Sino-American trade war': Michael Spence
'Xi visits a divided EU with charm and deals'
March 27, 2019
1. Mueller report give U.S. more clout in trade negotiations
2. 'The time of European naïveté towards China had ended': Macron
3. Xi in Europe: How China is outmaneuvering Trump on trade
4. 'The Belt and Road Initiative Impact on Europe: An Italian Perspective'
'Two Sessions' End
March 23, 2019
1. 'Foreign Investment Law': the level playing field
2. 'Foreign Investment Law': 'Tech transfer in China is no longer the main concern'
3. Yi Gang: 'China has deleveraged' | Michael Pettis: 'No. Debt has gone up'
4. 'China can't create growth- or jobs - out of tax cuts'
5. 'The manufacturing sector, mired in a crisis of confidence, needs more than this tax cut.'
6. With Streaks of Gray Hair, Xi Jinping of China Breaks With Tradition
7. Another insight from 'The Relevant Organs'
'Two Sessions' II
March 13, 2019
1. China's increased State role is reason for slowing economy, Lardy Says
2. Addressing the crisis of confidence - what Premier Li said and didn't say
3. Is China looking for 'good' shadow banks?
4. PODCAST (12m 22s) | Analysing China’s Two Sessions and the influence of tech company chiefs
5. Explaining the seating plan at China's Two Sessions
6. IN DEPTH | More Nick Lardy on 'The State Strikes Back: The End of Economic Reform in China?'
'Two Sessions' I
March 9, 2019
1. Facing Slowing Economic Growth, China’s Premier Promises Relief for Business
2. Six key takeaways from China's annual policy blueprint
3. China’s Stimulus Muddle Deepens
4. China’s ‘two sessions’: an economic watershed or more of the same?
5. Xi Jinping Works to Stifle Dissent Amid Concerns About China’s Economy
6. FINTECH: Two Sessions Sends Strong Signals on Support for Chinese Fintech Development
7. How tea is served in the Great Hall of the People in China
8. 'Two Sessions': A rap song extolling China's annual political meeting
Podcast